Media, Millennials, and Politics

Media, Millennials, and Politics: The Coming of Age of the Next Political Generation  by Alison N. Novak (Lexington Books, 2016)

This is an academic book written by a professor of communications at the university where I work, so most of you who follow my blog probably won’t have easy access to it. Nevertheless it was an interesting and well-written book that I learned a lot from. As the parent of two Millennials (adults under 35), I have been hearing lately about the concept of “millennial bashing” by the media. This book provides proof that it’s real. Dr. Novak collected and analyzed two datasets about media coverage of Millennials and politics: one included 50 randomly selected episodes of 6 cable tv news programs surrounding the 2008, 2010, 2012, and 2014 elections, and the other asked a cohort of actual Millennials to write journal entries after a weekly reading of the most popular articles on NewsWhip, an online news aggregator. Her analysis shows that despite turnout levels that likely swayed the 2008 and 2012 Presidential elections, Millennials as a group were consistently ignored, denigrated, and even vilified by large segments of the media. I was appalled to learn that the conservative news media actually accused Millennials of voting for Obama solely because he promised them “gifts” like free contraception and better student loan policies. Not surprisingly, Millennials in return showed little trust of media (even online media) as a source of political information.

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All our wrong todays

All our wrong todays by Elan Mastai (Dutton Books, 2017)

So, this is another sci-fi book about time travel and all the ways it can go wrong. This is a slightly different take on it, where the main character comes from a 2016 in an alternate timeline which is a high-tech utopian version of today. It’s a lot like the future in the movie Tomorrowland – a future based on the 1964 World’s Fair. Of course, he screws things up and ends up in our world instead. Oddly he likes it better. Anyway, it’s an interesting (and fairly long) novel; if you like science fiction you’ll probably enjoy it.

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Crosstalk

Crosstalk by Connie Willis (Random House, 2016)

It’s always a good idea to visit your library or bookstore regularly, because sometimes you will discover that your favorite author has published a new book. Award-winning science fiction author Connie Willis has written another great novel, but this one involves neither history nor time travel. It simply takes the current world, in which we are connected 24/7, a step farther.  What if someone invented a surgical procedure that would allow you to communicate telepathically with your romantic partner? What could go wrong? Read this book and find out!

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Filed under Romance, Science fiction

Steal across the sky

Steal across the sky by Nancy Kress (Tor, 2009)

This science fiction story has a unique premise which I won’t reveal. You should read it for yourself. I will say that 21 humans are selected by an alien race to visit several planets and “witness” a situation that they are expected to bring back news about to the Earth. The book takes place in a near future (nearer now than it was in 2009) early 2020’s that is not much different from the present. It tells the story of several young people who are selected for space travel, interact with the people on the other planets, and come back changed. In fact more than half of the story is what happens when they come back. This is the sort of book you will have to read to the end before you can go to sleep.

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The General’s Son

The General’s Son: Journey of an Israeli in Palestine by Miko Peled (Just World Books, 2012)

I recently heard Miko Peled speak at a conference, and after his speech I immediately bought his book. His story is very eye-opening for someone like me who has been consuming “mainstream media” coverage of Israel all my life. Peled is the son of a famous Israeli general who distinguished himself in both the 1948 and 1967 conflicts. But his father Matti Peled went on to become a peace activist, and Miko followed in his footsteps despite the way this stance put him at odds with his fellow Israelis.  As a young man, Miko Peled moved to southern California, opened a karate studio, and started a family. Then in 1997, after his 13-year-old niece was killed in a random bombing in Jerusalem, he joined a group of Palestinian peace activists in California. He started making several trips to Israel every year to get to know the Palestinian situation and try to help them (for example with medical supplies).

Over time Peled came to champion the Palestinian cause. He believes that a “two-state” solution is unfair (since Israel has taken nearly all of the Palestinian’s land) and the only real solution is a secular democracy where both peoples have equal rights. I have always thought the same thing myself and wondered why no else supported the idea. However I naively thought Palestinians were allowed to live anywhere in Israel and were only deprived of their religious rights, when in fact they are crammed into two small areas (Gaza and West Bank) and not allowed to travel or live anywhere else in the country.  In this book Peled makes his point by relating many horrifying stories about how Israelis abuses and kills Palestinians, some of which he personally witnessed. It is also pretty clear that the police abuse of American citizens we have been seeing here in the last few years has its origins in the way American and Israeli soldiers in the Middle East behave.

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Discordant Harmonies

Discordant Harmonies:  A New Ecology for the Twenty-first Century by Daniel B. Botkin (Oxford University Press, 1990).

A friend gave me this used book, knowing of my interest in environmental science, and it made a good companion for a cross-country airplane trip. Although it was published 27 years ago, it certainly belongs on the bookshelf of all environmentalists. Dr. Botkin was one of the pioneers in the field of ecological research in the U.S., and developed some of the first computer models. However, this is not an academic treatise; it is an attempt (and I think a successful one) to explain ecology to the general public. Botkin begins by exploring various ways of thinking about nature and our Earth – as a divine creation, as a machine, or as an organic being. He then explains how the idea of nature as a constant, steady-state system is scientifically false, because the historical data shows so much change of an essentially random nature. This understanding leads to some key consequences for the management of natural resources, which he illustrates through discussions of specific ecological niches which he has personally studied. Botkin clearly knows his environmental science, because in this book he predicted the climate change we have experienced since 1990.

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The Secret Chord

The Secret Chord by Geraldine Brooks (Viking, 2015)

This novel fleshes out the stories of the Old Testament about David, king of Israel. Brooks does a good job of showing all sides (good and bad) of David’s character, from the point of view of his prophet Nathan. Women are not neglected in this tale. Although overall they are treated very badly by the male characters, their stories are told as fully human beings living in a time when they are not respected. Unfortunately (male or female) in this book everyone’s life is full of violence, blood, and death, which is (as far as we know) how things really were. It’s hard to believe that the psalms that we still sing today came from this man, out of this time period.

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