Monthly Archives: September 2017

Burning Paradise

Burning Paradise by Robert Charles Wilson (Tom Doherty Associates, 2013)

The great thing about science fiction is that even when it is four years old, it usually doesn’t seem any less (or more) timely. Hugo Award winning author R. C. Wilson, whose work I haven’t encountered before, imagines in this novel an alternate 2014 that is just subtly different than the one we remember happening three years ago. The difference is the hive colony of aliens who reside in our upper atmosphere. This network of microscopic organisms acts as a parasite that steer the world  towards peace rather than war, by influencing our telecommunications (radio, tv, etc.)  This is so implausible that even in the story, only a small group of people know about it. Nevertheless, our heroes (a couple of college-age kids) eventually save the world. You would think we’d rather continue to have peace than war, but it’s complicated. I would have to give it an R rating for graphic violence and sex; it reads like a movie, though not one I’d particularly want to see. 

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The Stars are Fire

The Stars are Fire by Anita Shreve (Alfred A. Knopf, 2017)

I have no idea where Anita Shreve came up with the title, other than the fact that a huge wildfire is a major part of the plot. The main character saves her two young children from the fire that decimates her Maine town in the mid-1940s, but it leaves her with a bitter and disabled husband and some decisions to make. I associate wildfires with the West, but I suppose Maine was, and is, a heavily wooded rural state. This novel was an interesting “period piece” about post-war America, with plenty of descriptions of typical clothes and furnishings of the period. Apparently you could get a 3-course lunch for 25 cents, for instance. It was a mildly interesting story but not really anything special.

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