Category Archives: Nonfiction

Code Red: Computerized Election Theft and the New American Century

Code Red: Computerized Election Theft and the New American Century by Jonathan D. Simon (self-published, to buy go to www.codered2016.com)

I purchased this book after hearing the author speak at a conference on election reform. It’s definitely worth reading. Jonathan Simon, executive director of Election Defense Alliance, makes a strong case for the probability of computerized election theft. The United States has had computerized voting machines nationwide since the Help America Vote Act was passed as a reaction to the voting issues of the 2000 Presidential Election. This machines are built and programmed by private contractors, and totally under their control. There is no way to subpoena them to get an audit trail or access to the machines, because this information is considered proprietary. We are supposed to just trust the companies (who are all owned by Republican supporters). Therefore, conveniently, there is no way for those who question election results to produce evidence that election theft occurred. Nevertheless, Simon has spent the past 15 years doing forensic analysis of voting results and exit polls, and has very compelling statistical evidence that someone is changing votes in key contests so that right wing candidates win much more often than exit polls would indicate they should. It’s a fascinating and disturbing look into our supposedly democratic voting process.

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The Glass Universe

The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars by Dava Sobel (Viking, 2016)

Acclaimed writer Dava Sobel (Longitude, Galileo’s Daughter) has written another fascinating book that brings science to life, this time with the help of historical photos and letters. This book, like the recent movie Hidden Figures, is about women “computers.” Several of the women whose history is told in The Glass Universe are among the few well-known woman scientists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries (Annie Jump Cannon, Henrietta Leavitt, Cecilia Payne). Initially women were only allowed to serve as underpaid staff at Harvard Observatory who carried out tedious but very important calculations on photographs of stars taken on glass plates. Sobel notes that Harvard’s collection of half a million glass plates that captured the sky on each night between 1885 and 1992 is irreplaceable. As time went on these women astronomers were able to publish papers, present at international conferences, and hold professional titles. They were responsible for key discoveries in optical astronomy, such as the classification of stars and the relationship between brightness and period in variable stars.

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Strangers in their own land

Strangers in their own land: anger and mourning on the American right by Arlie Russell Hochschild (The New Press, 2016)

This nonfiction book written by a respected sociologist (her tenth book) is as readable as a novel. A resident of Berkeley, California, Dr. Hochschild spent the past six years visiting Louisiana, interviewing people on the political right and getting to know their culture. Her goal was to try to understand what she calls the Great Paradox. Red states that have the most industrial pollution and environmental damage consistently elect the most right wing Republican and Tea Party candidates. These politicians eliminate or fail to enforce environmental regulations, while offering incentives for fossil fuel companies to relocate to their states. Over the past twenty years states such as Louisiana have become havens for oil refineries, fracking operations, and all kinds of polluting industries. Hochschild takes a very personal approach in which she tries to “scale the empathy wall” and truly understand people whose political values are very different from her own. By visiting people’s homes, churches, and businesses, she gradually builds up a “deep story” about why people on the right end of the political spectrum prioritize jobs, their Christian faith, and their communities over the very real health impacts (such as cancer) that local environmental degradation is causing themselves and their families. Part of it is a deeply ingrained loyalty to the free market system and pride in being able to take care of themselves; part of it is a hatred of the federal government dating back to the Civil War. A key factor is that the South has an insular culture (most folks don’t ever travel far from home) with a heavy dependence on right-wing media sources like Fox News and talk radio. I recommend this book highly to liberal and progressive readers open-minded enough to want to understand people on the other end of the political spectrum. 

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Filed under Environment, Nonfiction, Politics

The Revolution Where You Live

The Revolution Where You Live by Sarah Van Gelder (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc., 2017)

The co-founder of Yes! Magazine, Sarah Van Gelder, wrote this book to tell the story of her “12,000 mile journey through a new America.”  Yes! Magazine (to which I subscribe) is an online and print outlet for articles by progressive “solutions journalists” who envision “positive futures” for our country. Van Gelder started from her home in the Seattle area in mid-August 2015 and drove all the way across the country and back home again, stopping along the way to learn and pass on inspiring stories of various communities. The unifying theme across these stories is the concept of “acting locally” to solve community problems. The problems that Van Gelder is concerned about involve poverty, inequality, racism, and climate change, and she encounters some great solutions like local food production, worker owned cooperatives, urban farms, time banks, and restorative justice circles. Because the author lives on land that belongs to an Indian reservation, indigenous peoples are featured in many of the book’s chapters, along with African-Americans and other people of color. Van Gelder didn’t talk to political leaders (with one exception) or CEOs of large think-tanks; her focus was on grassroots solutions being implemented by people in American communities, both rural and urban. This is an inspiring compilation about what must have been a wonderful journey.

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Rise of the Rocket Girls

Rise of the Rocket Girls: the women who propelled us, from missiles to the moon to Mars by Nathalia Holt (Little, Brown and Company, 2016)

This is the true story of the women who worked at California’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in a professional capacity from its founding in the early 1940s to the 1990s. In 2013, the author interviewed several dozen women who had worked as engineers at JPL over its history, making this into a collective biography that uses real names, photos, career highlights, and love stories. In the beginning they were called computers, because they literally used their mathematical skills to compute trajectories, escape velocities, and many other key parameters needed to guide rockets to their destinations. Though some of them had mathematics or even engineering degrees, the women who were hired at JPL in the 1940s and 1950s were not classified as engineers; they were part of a separate all-women group.  Those that stuck around JPL into the 1960s were eventually reclassified, when computers came to mean digital computing machines and gender discrimination started to be frowned upon. Prior to that they suffered significant discrimination, such as when they were forced to quit when they became pregnant. Threaded throughout the book are descriptions of the various space missions that JPL supported over the years and the many technical contributions made by women engineers. The black and white photographs really made the story come to life for me.

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Why America misunderstands the world

Why America Misunderstands the World by Paul R. Pillar (Columbia University Press, 2016)

This new book by retired CIA officer Paul Pillar tries to explain why Americans “misunderstand” the world. In other words, why our foreign policy is based on a very different perception of why people in other countries behave than those people themselves have. Despite having been a representative of the American way of looking at the world for his whole career, Paul Pillar has also spent a great deal of time in other countries. He reveals a lot of insight into the psychology of American thought with regard to foreign countries. Pillar explains how American exceptionalism developed from our unique history and geographical advantages, and how our lack of interest in learning about other nations has made us even more prone to misperceptions based on ignorance. Pillar is critical of right-wing leaders (such as the Bushes) but also tends to blame “the public” for not being smart enough to avoid being misled. I don’t like the “blame the victim” mentality (we’re not the ones with the power, after all), nor Pillar’s idea that leaders sometimes have to talk the public into doing what he considers the right thing. But it was an interesting book, and he makes the point very well that it is ridiculous to expect the war on terror to be the sort of war that comes to an end one day with a treaty (presumably with the U.S. winning).

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Garbology

Garbology: Our Dirty Love Affair with Trash by Edward Humes (Penguin Group, 2012)

As an environmental activist, I didn’t expect to learn anything new from this book, but I was really surprised. It was fascinating and well-written with many revelations. Humes doesn’t just quote statistics, he tells the story of trash from the perspective of real people who are involved with it. He interviews ocean explorers who research the “great Pacific garbage patch,” heavy machine operators who work in huge landfill operations, entrepreneurs who invented reusable bags and trash to energy facilities, artists whose medium is garbage, and families who strive for zero-waste lifestyles. Humes manages to simultaneously makes the reader very concerned and strangely optimistic about our future relationship with garbage. This is a must-read.

 

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